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Contents What Every Busy Family Should Know ................2 Why Eat Right ....................................................3 Introducing ChooseMyPlate.gov ..........................4 One Balance Your Calories..............................5 Two Eat More of Some Foods ......................6 What You Should Know About Fiber..............7 Three Eat Less of Some Foods ..................8 What You Should Know About Fat What You Should Know About Sugar ............9 What You Should Know

What Every Busy Family Should Know Busy families often think they dont ha ve time to make and eat healthy meals. Also, for many families, money may be tight. Yet there are many ways to make the most of every moment and every cent spent on food. This book can help. Here are some things you will lear n Why you should be as healthy as you can be What you can do to eat better Foods to eat in order to be healthier Easy ways to prepare healthy foods Shopping tips to help save you money Storage t

Why Eat Right 1. Eating right helps us be as healthy as possible. We get all the nutrition our body needs. 2. If we dont eat right, we could be more likely to become ill. We could get diabetes, heart disease, some types of cancer, andor weak bones. money. We miss work. We spend extra money going to the doctor and buying medicine. obese. We should do our best to be at a health y weight. 3. Being sick costs us 4. If we dont eat right, we could become overweight or Each of us is born with a di

Introducing ChooseMyPlate.gov The United States Department of Agriculture USDA has created the ChooseMyPlate graphic to help people learn how to eat better. ChooseMyPlate shows us what a healthy meal includes. Look at the picture above. We can see that half of the plate is vegetables and fruits. half of the plate is g rains and protein foods. the meal has a ser ving of dairy, such as milk. The USDA has created a website to teach you about eating healthy. It is www.ChooseMyPlate.gov. The next

1. Balance Your Calories Enjoy your food, but eat less of it. Eat smaller portions of food. Balance the calories you get from food and drink with the calories you burn off through exercise. Over time, the eating and exercise habits of Americans have changed. We now exercise less and spend more time in front of TVs and computers. And our food portions have grown. This has led to many people becoming overweight and obese 30 pounds or mor e over a healthy weight. A portion is the amount of food

2. Eat More of Some Foods Eat more fruits and vegetables. Eat more wholegrain foods. Make at least half of your g rains whole grains. Drink lowfat 1 or nonfat skim milk. Other dair y foodsyogurt and cheeseshould also be lowfat or nonfat. 6

What You Should Know About Fiber Fiber is found in fruits, vegetables, beans, and grains. We need fiber to help our digestion. The more that food gets refined or processed, the more fiber is lost. That is why you should have more wholegrain foods than refinedgrain foods. Here is a list of processed foods and the wholeg rain foods to have instead. Processed foods White bread White rice Regular pasta Wholegrain foods Wholewheat or wholegrain bread Brown rice Wholewheat pasta Remember, eating more

3. Eat Less of Some Foods Most people have too much fat, sugar, and salt in their diet. We can enjoy some, but not too much. What You Should Know About Fat Fat is naturally found in many foods. We need some fat in our food for these reasons Fat provides energy. Fat helps our bodies use vitamins and g row properly. Fat provides flavor in our foods. Fat helps us feel full. However, not all fats are the same. Eating too much of any fat can make us gain weight. And saturated fats and trans fats

What You Should Know About Sugar Sugar is a carbohydrate or carb. Sugar is naturally found in some foods, such as fruit. Sugar also is added to other foods and beverages, such as soda and cake. Sugar gives us energy. Sugar gives flavor to our foods. However, added sugar provides empty calories. This means it gives us energy without good nutrition. Too much sugar can make us gain weight. Sources of sugar Sugar added to coffee, tea, cereal, and recipes How can we cut back Try these foods without

What You Should Know About Salt Salt also is called sodium chloride. Sodium is naturally found in most foods. Salt is added to many foods, especially processed foods. Sodium helps our muscles and ner ves work right. Sodium also regulates blood pressure. Sodium is added to various food products, especially processed meats, canned soups, and vegetables. Fast foods have added sodium. Most of us eat too much salt. Too much salt can cause high blood pressure and heart disease. Sources of salt Sa

Learn to Read the Label The Nutrition Facts Label is on most pac kaged food. It will tell you important things about the food. Buy foods that are lower in fat, sugar, and sodium. Buy foods that are higher in fiber. Start here Check these Nutrition Facts Serving Size 1 cup 49g Servings Per Container 9 Amount Per Serving Calories 170 Total Fat 1g Saturated Fat 0g Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg Sodium 0mg Calories from Fat 10 Daily Value 2 0 0 0 13 22 Limit these nutrients Total Carbohydrate

Spices Seasonings to Keep on Hand Start a good collection of spices and seasonings. They add flavor in many recipes. We need salt in our pantr y. However, if we also have other spices and seasonings, we can learn to use less salt. Some spices and seasonings can be costly at first. But we only use small amounts of spices. Small bottles or pac kages of them will last a long time. Spices and seasonings eventually lose their fla vor. Buy small amounts unless you find you use something a lot. Store

Pantry Basics Keep healthful foods in your pantr y. Making meals at home can save money. Homemade meals are healthier and better for us than alreadyprepared foods we buy at the store or fast food restaurants. This list of foods is good to ha ve on hand at all times. Items on it can be used in many recipes. Keep these foods in a dry, clean pantry or closet. Use airtight containers so they stay fresh longer. Allpurpose flour Wholewheat flour Sugar Baking soda Baking powder Dry milk Vegetab

Shopping on a Budget Here are some ideas to make the most of every dollar you spend on food Set a reasonable food budget for your family. Plan meals ahead of time. Make a shopping list, and stick to it. Shop only once a week. Pick the grocery store with the lowest prices. Conveniencestore food usually costs more. Check for sales and use coupons. Buy store brands. These usually cost less. Learn to read Nutrition Facts labels and pick healthier foods. Buy things you use a lot in bulk. Sha

Bring Home More Fruits Vegetables Fresh fruits and vegetables do not k eep long. Buy only what your family will use within a few days. Look for bargains in newspaper ads, mailers, or online. Buy fresh fruits and vegetables in season. They cost less then. Shop at farmers markets. Food fresh from the farm tastes great. Some farmers markets will take SNAP cards. Or join a produce coop in your town. Choose canned or frozen fruits and vegetables with no added sugar and salt. Buy in bulk when theyre

SAMPLE Easy Menu Planner Sunday Monday 12 Bagel with peanut butter Lowfat yogurt 100 Orange juice Recipes are found on pages 1730 Tuesday Wednesday Pumpkin Oatmeal Strawberries 100 Orange juice Thursday Friday Saturday Breakfast Rise Shine Wholegrain cereal Breakfast Cobbler wskim milk Skim milk Banana 100 Orange juice Wholegrain cereal wskim milk Banana 100 Grape juice Scrambled eggs Breakfast Burrito Wholewheat toast Strawberries Orange slices Skim milk Skim milk Lunch Peanut butt

Recipes The following pages provide recipes for the starred items in the Easy Menu Planner on pa ge 16. Each recipe is easy, healthy, and inexpensive to make . Homemade AllPurpose Mix This easy recipe can save you money. You can use it to make many things. It can be used in sever al recipes that follow. Ingredients 5 cups flour cup baking powder 1 tablespoon sugar teaspoon salt 1 cup shortening In a medium bowl, mix flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. Using a fork, cut in shortening until

Pancakes, Biscuits Pie Crusts For Pancakes Serving size 1 small pancake Makes 46 small pancakes Combine 1 cup of allpurpose mix and cup skim milk. Stir to mix. Cook on greased griddle or fr ying pan until golden brown. Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 1 oz For Biscuits Serving size 1 biscuit biscuits Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein Nutrient Totals Pie Pancakes Biscuits Crust 110 130 103 4g 5g 4g 1g 1g 1g 218

Rise Shine Breakfast Cobbler Serving size cup Makes 4 servings Ingredients 1 cup juicepacked canned sliced peaches, drained 1 cup juicepacked canned sliced pear halves, drained 6 pitted prunes, cut in half or other dried fruit teaspoon vanilla extract 1 orange, zested and juiced 1 cup lowfat granola Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains 12 oz Vegetables Fruits 1c Dairy Protein Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 280 1g 0g 60 mg 3g Preparation

Pumpkin Oatmeal This is a good recipe for holidays. It is also a good way to add more vegetables to your diet. Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 2 oz 18 cup Serving size 1 cup Makes 4 servings Ingredients 4 cups water 2 cups dry oldfashioned oatmeal cup canned pumpkin 4 teaspoons cinnamon 1 or skim milk optional Sugar or sweetener optional Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 182 4g 1 g 11 mg 6g Preparation

Breakfast Burrito Serving size 1 burrito Makes 1 serving Ingredients 6inch wholewheat tortilla 1 egg cup nonfat black or pinto beans, cooked or canned 1 tablespoon salsa 1 teaspoon olive or vegetable oil Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 1 oz 1 cup 2 oz Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 293 15 g 5g 558 mg 16 g 2 tablespoons lowfat cheese cheddar or cheese of choice Preparation 1. Scramble egg in 1 teaspoon

Chicken Pot Pie Serving size 16 pie Makes 6 servings Ingredients 2 pie crusts See AllPurpose Mix recipe, pages 1718. 2 cups cooked chicken. Use canned chicken or about 2 chicken breasts. Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 2 oz 12 cup 2 oz Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 374 15 g 4g 766 mg 21 g 2 cups total of various fresh, frozen, or lowsodium canned vegetables, such as cup corn, cup peas, cup carrots,

Salmon Patties Serving Size 1 patty Makes 9 servings Ingredients 1 can 15 ounces salmon, drained 1 cup wholegrain, crushed cereal or crackers 2 large eggs, lightly beaten cup lowfat 1 milk teaspoon black pepper Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 12 oz 2 oz Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 110 4.5 g 12 g 270 mg 12 g 1 tablespoon vegetable oil Preparation 1. Use a fork or clean fingers to flake salmon unti

Chicken Veggie Spaghetti Serving size 1 cup Makes 4 servings Ingredients 2 cups cooked chopped chicken. Use canned chicken or about 2 chicken breasts. 2 cups chopped broccoli fresh or frozen. You can try other vegetables too. 8 oz dry spaghetti about 1 inch diameter. To measure dry spaghetti, form a circle around the spaghetti by touching the tip of your first finger to the tip of your thumb. 3 cups tomato sauce 1 tablespoon Italian seasoning teaspoon black pepper Instead of the tomato sauce,

Preparation 1. In a mediumsized pan, add the tomato Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 2 oz 1 cup 2 oz sauce, Italian seasoning, and pepper. Stir until mixed and bring to a simmer lo w boil. to simmer for 5 minutes. 2. Add the chicken and broccoli and continue 3. To cook spaghetti, bring 6 cups of wa ter to a boil. Add the dry spaghetti and cook until you can twirl it on a fork. broccoli. Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat

Black Beans Pasta Serving size 1 cup Makes 4 servings Ingredients 1 8 oz package fusilli or gemelli pasta or use spaghetti instead 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 onion, chopped or 6 tablespoons dried onion 1 15 oz can black beans, drained cup thinly sliced, oilpacked, sundried tomatoes 1 cup feta cheese, crumbled Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 2 oz 12 cup 14 cup 2 oz Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 475 20 g 6g

Lentil Chili Serving size 1 cup Makes 6 servings Ingredients pound extralean ground beef 1 cups chopped onion 1 clove garlic, crushed 2 cups cooked, drained lentils 1 can 29 oz tomatoes, diced or crushed 1 tablespoon chili powder teaspoon ground cumin optional Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 34 cup 2 oz Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 210 4.5 g 1.5 g 470 mg 16 g Preparation 1. In a large saucepan, bro

Roasted Root Vegetables Serving size 1 cup Makes 4 servings Ingredients 2 mediumsized sweet potatoes, cut into large chunks 2 carrots, chopped Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 1 14 cup Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 250 15 g 2g 150 mg 5g 2 mediumsized other root vegetables white potatoes, rutabagas, turnips, parsnips, beets, cut into large chunks 1 medium onion, chopped cup vegetable oil 3 tablespoons

Outasight Salad Serving Size 1 cup Makes 4 servings Ingredients 2 cups salad greens of your choice 1 cup chopped vegetables tomatoes, cucumbers, carrots, green beans 1 cup juicepacked pineapple chunks, drained, or fresh orange segments cup dressing see below 2 tablespoons dried cranberries 2 tablespoons chopped nuts, any kind Dressing cup yogurt, nonfat, plain 1. In a small bowl, mix all or fruitflavored ingredients. Refrigerate until ready to serve. 1 tablespoon orange juice 1 teaspoons white

Frozen Fruit Cups Serving Size 1 fruit cup Makes 18 servings Ingredients 3 bananas, mashed 24 oz yogurt, nonfat strawberry flavored or plain 10 oz strawberries, frozen, thawed, undrained without sugar or syrup added 1 can 8 oz crushed pinea pple, undrained Food Group Amounts Color Food Group Amount Grains Vegetables Fruits Dairy Protein 14 cup 14 cup Nutrients Per Serving Calories Total Fat Saturated Fat Sodium Protein 50 0g 0g 25 mg 2g Preparation 1. Line muffin tins with paper baking cup

How Much Should We Have From Each Food Group Our servings per day from each food group depend on several things. Age Gender How active we are The table below gives you some guidelines on ho w much to eat from each food group depending on a ge. To learn more, visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov. Age Fruit 25 Years 11 cups 610 Years 11 cups 1113 Years 1 2 cups 1418 Years 22 cups 2 3 cups 610 oz 1935 Years 22 cups 3 4 cups 6 10 oz 3650 Years 1 2 cups 2 3 cups 6 10 oz 50 Years 12 cups 23 cups 5

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